About Fiona Higgins – Batik Artist

Fiona Higgins, a batik artist, works at home in her studio in Letterkenny, Co. Donegal. Her work is inspired by the beautiful scenery of the North West of Ireland, particularly the Gaeltacht on the West coast of Donegal where I have always spent a part of my summer, ever since I was a child.

In landscapes, seascapes, grasses and trees, I try to capture the vivid and ever-changing light and colour of the shifting seasons and unpredictable weather. In one work I might express the luminous quality of sunlight pouring through leaves in spring, in another, I might represent the intense colours of the land and sky found after a summer thunderstorm.

I studied fine art painting in the Dublin Institute of Technology, and qualified for a teacher’s diploma in the College of Marketing and Design. I taught art for ten years in a secondary school, and then decided to work full-time as an artist.

I specialize in batik painting on silk. I prefer to use silk as a medium since the wax flows straight through the fabric when painted on with a brush; this makes it possible to include fine details. I also use a brush to paint on the dyes, which allows me to achieve a wider variety of colours and blended tones compared to the traditional batik technique of dip-dying.

Donegal Landscapes

The trees and flowers of the North West of Ireland — broad landscapes of the Derryveagh mountains including Muckish and Errigal. Grasses, flowers, rocks and heather from Rannafast in the Donegal gaeltacht.

Seascape

Seascapes of the northwest coastline, particularly the wild seas around Cruit island, and detailed works.

About Batik Art

Batik is originally an Indonesian art. The craft spread from Asia to the Middle-East through trade.

Detail of ‘Sea Patterns’ showing the cracked texture In the process of batik, wax is applied to fabric – usually cotton or silk – using either a brush or a tool called a tjanting. The wax acts as a resist to the dye which is then applied to the fabric. Layers of wax and dye are applied, working from light tones to dark tones, to create the image. Breaking the hardened wax layer before the dying stages can produce batik’s unique cracked texture.

Finally, the wax is removed by ironing the batik between sheets of paper, and the batik is washed and dried.

Fiona Higgins Batik Artist

Donegal Landscape Batik Art

The trees and flowers of the North West of Ireland — broad landscapes of the Derryveagh mountains including Muckish and Errigal. Grasses, flowers, rocks and heather from Rannafast in the Donegal gaeltacht.

Seascape Batik Art

Seascapes of the northwest coastline, particularly the wild seas around Cruit island, and detailed works of breaking waves.

Landscape

The trees and flowers of the North West of Ireland — broad landscapes of the Derryveagh mountains including Muckish and Errigal. Grasses, flowers, rocks and heather from Rannafast in the Donegal gaeltacht.

Seascape

Seascapes of the northwest coastline, particularly the wild seas around Cruit island, and detailed works.